The CRUHUB Podcast #3: Mikael Opstrup, EDN


*** SCROLL DOWN FOR SPANISH VERSION ***

Find this podcast episode here (in English):


CRUHUB:

You are Head of Studies & Co-production Guide Editor of EDN, European Documentary Network. Can you tell us a bit about EDN?

Mikael Opstrup: Yes, it’s an organization that was established more than twenty years ago. It’s based in Copenhagen and the umbrella is that we do anything we can do to improve the conditions for documentary film. Now, that’s a very big thing. The way we do it is that we organize or co-organize events like DocsBarcelona, for instance, so we help filmmakers in improving their projects and we help them to bring them together with potential financiers and we help them to conduct meetings with them. That’s part of it.

Another thing we do is that we give out a lot of information. You just mentioned that I’m the editor of the Co-Production Guide, so in that you can find a guide that tells you about the co-production possibilities in 30 European countries.

So it’s partly information and partly it´s helping the filmmakers, and partly we try to establish structures around the world that will improve the conditions for documentary to work. It’s a lot of different stuff but it’s all about improving the conditions for people to make documentaries.

CRUHUB:

Have you seen some changes in the last years? Are there more documentaries produced, are there less produced? Is there more or less money involved?

Mikael Opstrup:

Yes, it’s very interesting because there are two very contradictory directions. If we go like… let’s go 10 years back. For the last 10 years there have been produced so much more documentaries, there are distributed so much more documentaries, so documentaries are available to basically everybody.

At the same time, the conditions for making documentaries have gone down dramatically. The financing is so much more difficult now. I started out as a producer myself. Five to ten years ago it would take me one to two years to finance an international documentary, now it would take me three to four.

The main reason is that public television has gone down dramatically. On smaller budgets, they have to produce so much more hours. It’s been the same in every country. That’s one of the reasons why it has become difficult. That’s one of the biggest changes. Everybody can now see it because they are now online but the conditions for the filmmakers have become dramatically more difficult.

CRUHUB: On the other side, the private one’s have grown.

Mikael Opstrup:

The private one’s have gone up but the kind of documentaries that, for instance, are here, at DocsBarcelona, very few of them are broadcast on the private channels. The private channels are more commercial, more journalistic, more dependent on hot topics that people want to see, while the public broadcasters take more that kind of documentaries that takes a little more effort from the viewer, that we sometimes label “creative documentary” which is not a very good word because it sort of indicates that other films are not creative which is not the case. But still… those kind of character-driven stories are a little more difficult on TV.

CRUHUB: What benefits do filmmakers have when they become a member of your network?

Mikael Opstrup:

Of EDN? Well, they get a lot of the information that is available, they get access to that, which you don’t if you aren’t a member.

For instance, the co-production guide that I just told you about: The co-production possibilities in European countries. You get access to that. We give out another publication where you find all the slots in Europe on public TV. I mean, every single little slot. So if you have a film that it is about art you can find all the arts slots from all the public broadcasters in Europe. And you can see the length, the profile and the contact information.

As a member you can get discounts at a lot of festivals and other events. And finally you can consult us, me and my colleagues at EDN, for basically the same what we have been doing here at DocsBarcelona for two days: people can send in their trailer and they can get comments, or they can do a little pitch or get advice: “Where do you think I can sell my film?” or stuff like that. So those are examples of what you get from being a member of EDN.

CRUHUB: So here at DocsBarcelona you are facilitating the workshop “The Magic of a Great Project and Pitch” together with Catherine Olsen. What are your key topics?

Mikael Opstrup:

My first priority when I see a project is to try to find out if the director knows what she or he is doing. By that I mean that I experience quite often that a director presents a certain project verbally, and then when I see the visual I think it´s another film.

So that would always be my first priority to find out whether the director and I as a viewer, or as a tutor in this case, see the same film.

Secondly, since we are in a context where they will pitch internationally I´m trying to find out whether I do believe that they have an international project or they have a more local project. There is nothing wrong with a local project but if you try to squeeze it to something that it´s not, because you´re in an international context, it becomes difficult.

And the third priority here would be to teach people how to present, because one thing is to know what you want to do and another thing is to present it, which is very, very difficult. So we spend a lot of time on that. Is it coming through to us? Those would be probably my three main priorities in a context like here.

CRUHUB:

Are there something like three no-go´s a director should never do?

Mikael Opstrup:

The first no-go is to try to sell a subject and not a film. It´s an illness within documentary film. You don´t have it in fiction because in fiction there is only a story that you create. So you would always sell a story. In documentary there is a reality that you´re filming and making a story based on. Very often I see people trying to sell what I call the reality, and not sell the story. However, reality can be turned into a film, a painting, an article, a lecture, a book, etc. but you need to sell the film. I think it´s because it´s difficult so we hide behind reality. “This fantastic man experienced this very dramatic” bla-bla-bla, but that´s him, that´s not your film. so that is always my first no-go. Don´t tell me about the reality, tell me about the film you want to make.

CRUHUB:

Your perspective?

Mikael Opstrup:

The film as an art form and as a product which includes your perspective, of course, I agree. But it´s more than your perspective. It´s also your structure, your visual language, your everything that forms this piece of art that a documentary film is. There are a lot of documentary film directors who want to convince me about something: environmental issues, social issues, political issues, which I think is very important but it´s not enough because anyone can do that, in any form. But to make a piece of art and a documentary film is a completely different matter. So for me that would be the first no-go.

The second no-go in terms of presenting your film is to put on a show, if I was a decision-maker, to try to trigger me into… “I´m being smart and put on a show.” It doesn´t work. You see it, and most decision-makers are very experienced and they look right through you. A lot of decision-makers have experienced having seen a seductive trailer and then when they see the film they get very, very disappointed. So, don´t try to seduce people, try to present the film as it will be because otherwise you´ll have a very short professional life within the documentary business. Because once a commissioning editor (or someone else) has felt that they were seduced and you didn´t deliver what they sort of expected, they will never come back to you. I know you asked for three, these were two, and that´ll do (laughs).

CRUHUB:

Do you think there is a way to really see it as a business? Can people build their career on documentary?

Mikael Opstrup:

We have to differentiate a little because in Denmark, or let´s say in the Nordic countries, like France, Germany, few other countries, it is a possibility. It is very, very difficult but it is a possibility to have it as a business. In Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, it´s almost impossible. So it depends a little where we are in the world. But even if we take the Northern and the Western countries that are primarily stronger because they have strong national film funds and strong public broadcasters: Even there it´s difficult. In Denmark, maybe five to ten companies that live from only producing documentaries. Most companies will have to do something else. So, it´s very difficult to have a sustainable business producing only documentaries.

CRUHUB:

You should always build your career on two columns.

Mikael Opstrup:

People have different strategies, but some do that. Others do it a little differently. But, yes, usually if you want to live from making films you usually need to do something more than only making documentary films. It´s too difficult.

CRUHUB:

Is there anything else you would like to share with emerging directors and producers in the documentary world? Would you inspire them or would you say “be careful”?

Mikael Opstrup:

I would first say, we, who work in the documentary world, are so much nicer than those who work in fiction. And I can put it a little differently. I think there is a fantastic colleagueness and willingness to share your knowledge within the documentary world. I see the fiction world as much more competitive. I don´t know how many people from the fiction world will see (hear/read) this – I see much bigger egos, and I see much bigger competition in the fiction world.

I think to be in the documentary world is a life-changing experience, it´s fantastic. I´ve spent two days here at DocsBarcelona with 19 film projects that tomorrow will be asking for exactly the same money. So, in principle they are competing. What they have done to improve their colleagues’ projects with suggestions and help, it´s fantastic. So, that´s maybe the most important thing, I would say.

CRUHUB:

Which film festival would you recommend filmmakers to attend?

Mikael Opstrup:

It depends on your profile as a filmmaker because I think you should go to the festival that fits your profile. If we take the bigger festivals, for instance, IDFA in Amsterdam, maybe they have a more social profile than, for instance, Visions du Réel in Nyon that has a more artistic and more theatrical profile. If you take CPH:DOX in Copenhagen, they have a profile of challenging the borders of traditional documentary. Every festival has a different profile.

But, Amsterdam being the biggest one, if you should choose one I would recommend you to choose that have the biggest variation of films, you will always find a film for your taste. And if you are a producer, director who wants to learn about the industry, they have the biggest industry section. When I was a producer, when I was younger, I would always sit in three days, listen to pitches at IDFA because it was a little film school about the market. I learned so much about presenting. So, this guy from Danish television, what does he want? This woman from ZDF, what is she looking for? So you can scan what the broadcasters are looking for and their comments, their approaches to a documentary project, when it´s presented like it will be at DocsBarcelona. It´s a little film school in market analysis.

CRUHUB:

Thank you very much! Anything you want to add?

Mikael Opstrup:

You can get a discount on going to IDFA if you´re a member of EDN.

 

Interview and producer of the podcast: Canan Turan & Markus Ruf

Camera: Georgie Uris

Editing of the teaser: Anabel Rodríguez Venzalá

 

*** SPANISH VERSION ***

CRUHUB:

Encuentra este episodio de nuestro podcast aquí (en castellano):


CRUHUB: Eres Jefe de Estudios & Editor de la Guía de Co-Producción, de la Red Europea de Documental (European Documentary Network, EDN). ¿Puedes contarnos un poco sobre EDN?

Mikael Opstrup: Sí, es una organización que comenzó hace más de veinte años. Se fundó en Copenhague y el paraguas que envuelve todo es que nosotros hacemos cualquier cosa para mejorar las condiciones para el cine documental, pues eso es algo muy grande. La forma en la que lo hacemos es que organizamos o co-organizamos eventos como DocsBarcelona, por ejemplo, y ayudamos a cineastas a mejorar sus proyectos, traemos a financiadores potenciales y les ayudamos a tener un encuentro con ellos. Eso es parte de esto.

Otra cosa que hacemos es que damos mucha información. Acabas de mencionar que soy el editor de la Guía de Co-producción, por lo que puedes encontrar una guía que te diga sobre las posibilidades de co-producción en 30 países europeos.

Así que es parte información y parte es ayudar a cineastas y además tratamos de establecer estructuras alrededor del mundo que mejorarán las condiciones del documental para trabajar.

Por lo tanto, son muchas cosas distintas pero todo trata de mejorar las condiciones para que las personas hagan documentales.

CRUHUB:

¿Has visto algunos cambios en los últimos años? ¿Se producen más documentales, hay menos producidos? ¿Hay más o menos dinero involucrado?

Mikael Opstrup:

Sí, es muy interesante porque hay dos direcciones muy contradictorias. Si vamos… vamos diez años atrás. En los últimos diez años han sido producidos muchos más documentales, hay distribuidos muchos más documentales, así que los documentales están disponibles para básicamente todo el mundo.

Al mismo tiempo, las condiciones para hacer documentales han bajado dramáticamente.

La financiación es mucho más complicada ahora. Comencé como productor. Hace cinco o diez años me habría llevado uno o dos años financiar un documental internacional, ahora me llevaría tres o cuatro.

La principal razón es que la televisión pública ha bajado dramáticamente. Con presupuestos más pequeños, tienen que producir muchas más horas. Ocurre lo mismo en cada país.

Esa es una de las razones de por qué se ha convertido en algo difícil. Es uno de los cambios más grandes. Todo el mundo puede verlo ahora porque están ahora online pero las condiciones para los cineastas se han convertido dramáticamente en algo muy complicado.

CRUHUB: Por otro lado, la privada ha crecido.

Mikael Opstrup:

La privada ha ido hacia arriba pero el tipo de documental que, por ejemplo, hay aquí, en DocsBarcelona, muy pocos de ellos son transmitidos en canales privados.

Los canales privados son más comerciales, más periodísticos, más dependientes de temas actuales que la gente quiere ver, mientras que los canales públicos toman más ese tipo de documentales que merecen un poco más de esfuerzo por parte del espectador, aquellos que a veces denominamos “documental creativo”, lo cual no es una palabra muy buena porque indica un poco que otras películas no son creativas, lo cual no es el caso. Pero aún así… este tipo de historias con personajes que conducen la acción son un poco más difíciles en TV.

CRUHUB: ¿Qué beneficios tienen los cineastas cuando se convierten en miembros de la EDN?

Mikael Opstrup:

Bueno, consiguen un montón de información que está disponible, consiguen acceso a ello, lo cual no sucede si no eres miembro.

Por ejemplo, la guía de co-producción que te he comentado: las posibilidades de co-producción en los países europeos. Consigues acceso a eso. Distribuimos otra publicación donde puedes encontrar las franjas en Europa en la TV pública. Es decir, cada pequeña franja. Así que si tienen una película que es sobre arte puedes encontrar todas las franjas sobre arte de todos los canales públicos en Europa. Y puedes ver la duración, el perfil y la información de contacto.

Siendo miembro puedes conseguir descuentos en muchos festivales y otros eventos. Y finalmente puedes consultarnos, a mí y a mis compañeros y compañeras en EDN, para, básicamente, lo mismo que hemos estado haciendo aquí en DocsBarcelona en estos dos días: la gente nos puede mandar su trailer y pueden recibir comentarios, o pueden hacer un pequeño pitch u obtener consejos: “¿Dónde crees que puedo vender mi película?” o cosas así. Ésto son ejemplos de lo que consigues siendo miembro de EDN.

CRUHUB: Aquí, en DocsBarcelona, estás facilitando el workshop de “The Magic of a Great Project and Pitch” junto con Catherine Olsen. ¿Cuáles son tus temas clave?

Mikael Opstrup:

Mi primera prioridad cuando veo un proyecto es tratar de averiguar si el director o la directora sabe lo que ella o él está haciendo. Con eso me refiero a que a veces experimento el hecho de que un director o directora presenta un cierto proyecto verbalmente, y entonces cuando veo la parte visual creo que es otra película. Así que esa sería siempre mi primera prioridad, descubrir si el director y yo como espectador, o como tutor en éste caso, vemos la misma película.

En segundo lugar, desde que estamos en un contexto donde hacen un pitch internacionalmente, estoy intentando saber si tienen un proyecto internacional o un proyecto más local. No hay nada malo en un proyecto local, pero si intentas exprimir algo que no lo es porque estás en un contexto internacional, se convierte en algo complicado.

Y la tercera prioridad aquí sería enseñar a las personas cómo presentar, porque una cosa es saber lo que quieres hacer y otra es presentarlo, lo cual es muy, muy complicado. Así que gastamos mucho tiempo en eso. ¿Se transmite el documental en la presentación? Esos serían probablemente mis tres prioridades principales en un contexto así.

CRUHUB:

¿Hay algo como los tres “no lo hagas” que un director nunca debe hacer?

Mikael Opstrup:

El primero es intentar vender un tema y no una película. Es una enfermedad en el documental. No ocurre en ficción porque en ficción solo hay una historia que tú creas. Así que siempre podrías vender una historia. En documental hay una realidad que estás rodando y tu creas una historia basada en ella. Muy frecuentemente veo a personas intentando vender lo que yo llamo la realidad, y no venden la historia. Sin embargo, se puede convertir a la realidad en película, una pintura, un artículo, un texto, un libro, etc. pero necesitas vender la película. Creo que es porque es complicado así que nos escondemos detrás de la realidad. “Es un hombre fantástico, ha experimentado  algo dramático” bla-bla-bla, pero eso es él, no tu película, así que eso siempre es mi primer “no lo hagas”. No me cuentes sobre la realidad, cuéntame sobre la película que quieres hacer.

CRUHUB:

¿Tu perspectiva?

Mikael Opstrup:

El cine como una forma de arte y un producto que incluye tu perspectiva, por supuesto, coincido. Pero es más que tu perspectiva. Es también tu estructura, tu lenguaje visual, todo lo que forma ésta pieza de arte que es un documental. Hay muchos directores que me quieren convencer sobre algo: problemas en el medio ambiente, problemas sociales, problemas políticos… lo cual creo que es muy importante, pero no es suficiente porque todo el mundo puede hacer eso de cualquier forma. Pero crear una pieza de arte y un documental es un asunto completamente distinto. Para mí eso debería ser el primer “no lo hagas”.

El segundo “no lo hagas” en referencia a presentar tu película sería convertirlo en un espectáculo, si yo fuese el que tomase la decisión, intentar convencerme… “Estoy siendo listo y he creado un espectáculo.” Eso no funciona. Lo ves, y la mayoría de los que toman la decisión son muy experimentados y lo detectan. Muchos de ellos han experimentado haber visto un trailer seductor y entonces cuando han visto la película se decepcionan mucho. Por ello, no trates de seducir a la gente, intenta presentar la película como será porque de otra forma tendrás una corta vida profesional en el negocio del documental. Porque una vez un  commissioning editor (o cualquier otra persona) ha sentido que fue seducido y no has cumplido con lo que esperan, nunca volverán a ti. Sé que me has preguntado por tres, ésas son dos, pero ya está  (risas)

CRUHUB:

¿Crees que hay una manera de verlo realmente como un negocio? ¿Pueden las personas construir una carrera sobre el documental?

Mikael Opstrup:

Tenemos que diferenciar un poco porque en Dinamarca, o digamos en los países Nórdicos, como Francia, Alemania, algunos otros países, hay una posibilidad. Es muy complicado pero hay una posibilidad de que sea un negocio. En Europa del Este, en Europa del Sur es casi imposible. Depende un poco de dónde estemos en el mundo. Pero incluso si tomamos los países del Norte y del Oeste que primariamente son más fuerte porque tienen fondos nacionales más fuertes y canales públicos más fuertes: incluso ahí es complicado. En Dinamarca, quizás de cinco a diez empresas viven sólo produciendo documentales. La mayoría tendrán que hacer algo. Es muy complicado tener un negocio sostenible produciendo sólo documentales.

CRUHUB:

Siempre debes construir tu carrera en dos columnas.

Mikael Opstrup:

La gente tiene diferentes estrategias, pero algunos lo hacen así. Otros lo hacen de forma un poco distinta. Pero sí, usualmente si quieres vivir de hacer películas normalmente necesitas hacer algo más que sólo crear documentales. Es demasiado complicado.

CRUHUB:

¿Hay algo más que te gustaría compartir con directores y directoras emergentes y productores y productoras en el mundo documental? ¿Les animarías o les dirías “ten cuidado”?

Mikael Opstrup:

Primero diría, nosotros, quienes trabajamos en el mundo documental, somos mucho más agradables que los que trabajan en ficción. Y puedo decirlo de forma algo distinta. Creo que hay un fantástico compañerismo y disposición a compartir tu conocimiento en el mundo documental. Veo el mundo de la ficción mucho más competitivo. No sé cuántas personas del mundo de la ficción verá (escuchará/leerá) esto; veo muchos grandes egos y mucha más competición en el mundo de la ficción.

Creo que estar en el mundo documental es una experiencia que te cambia la vida, es fantástico. He pasado dos días aquí en DocsBarcelona con 19 proyectos que mañana estarán preguntando por exactamente el mismo dinero. En principio están compitiendo. Lo que han hecho para mejorar los proyectos de sus compañeros con ayuda y aportaciones es fantástico. Así que creo que es la cosa más importante, diría.

CRUHUB:

¿Qué festival de cine recomiendas a los cineastas para que asistan?

Mikael Opstrup:

Depende de tu perfil como cineasta porque creo que debes ir al festival que vaya con tu perfil. Si tomamos los grandes festivales, por ejemplo, IDFA en Amsterdam, quizás tienen un perfil más social que, por ejemplo, Visions du Réel en Nyon que tiene un perfil más artístico y de visionado en cines. Si tomas CPH:DOX en Copenhague, tienen un perfil de retar las barreras del documental tradicional. Cada festival tiene un perfil distinto.

Pero, Amsterdam siendo el más grande, si debes elegir uno recomendaría que elijas el que tenga la mayor variación de películas, siempre encontrarás una película de tu gusto. Y si eres un productor, director, que quiere aprender sobre la industria, tienen la mayor  sección de industria. Cuando era productor, cuando era más joven, siempre me sentaba tres días escuchando pitches en IDFA porque es una pequeña escuela de cine sobre el mercado. Aprendí mucho sobre presentar. Así que, este chico de la televisión danesa, ¿qué quiere? Ésta mujer de ZDF, ¿qué está buscando? Así puedes escanear lo que las cadenas de televisión están buscando y sus comentarios, sus acercamientos a un proyecto de documental, cuándo es presentado como será en DocsBarcelona… Es una pequeña escuela de cine sobre el análisis de mercado.

CRUHUB:

¡Muchas gracias! ¿Algo más que quieras añadir?

Mikael Opstrup:

Puedes conseguir un descuento en ir a IDFA si eres miembro de EDN.

Entrevista: Canan Turan & Markus Ruf

Cámara: Markus Ruf

Montaje del teaser: Anabel Rodríguez Venzalá